The Blog

Tips & Tricks

5 Things To Do While You Are Stuck Inside

These are some strange times… strange times indeed. Fear not friends, this will all be figured out soon. For now, make sure you are safe and responsible. You may find yourself spending a lot of time inside (just like us) over the next few weeks. Here are 5 things to do so that you don’t go stir crazy.

Watch X Games’ Real Ski and vote for Alex Hackel

Alex is on our ski team and he is amazing. His Real Ski part is insane so watch it and vote for him. Protip: You can vote once a day, so do it every day. http://www.xgames.com/xgames/real/28891617/hackel-28891692

Get a Jump on Spring Cleaning

spring cleaning
Clean all the things

This isn’t inherently fun but it can be. Put on your favorite maids outfit and get scrubbing. Or maybe you need to go through that closet and get organizing. You will feel so much better when you can finally find that one shirt that g-ma got you.

Support Small Businesses Online

Make sure you support your favorite small guy. Stock up on those non-essentials that will come in handy when it’s time to go outside and enjoy the outdoors again. https://www.outdoortechnology.com/

Write A Letter and Mail It

This is for you.

It’s crazy, right? Just think of the glory and excitement that someone will get when they have an actual letter in their mailbox. Not a bunch of coupons or political campaign nonsense. An actual letter… from an actual friend. Maybe the letter is a poem. Maybe it’s a love letter. Or maybe it’s a dissertation on why Blue Cheese is awful and should be banned throughout the world.

Make A List of Something and Post it to Social Media

Selfie

Lists are fun. Creating a list of 5 things to do during quarantine can be fun. There might be a little research involved. But at this point, you are really grasping for content out of shear boredom. Well at least you a being productive. Let me see your list.

Best Workouts for Rock Climbing

Climbing is a sport full of diversity of muscle use, critical thinking, and experience. Whether you are just starting, an avid gym climber, or you enjoy weekend adventure outside, you may be looking for ways to improve your climbing. 

Finding workouts that not only strengthen critical muscles to push past grades is essential. Overuse is a common occurrence, especially amongst climbers just starting in the sport. We are going to take a look at a few workouts that will build up the necessary strength to improve your climbing but will prevent injury as well. 

Personalize Your Climbing Specific Exercise Plan

One of the best ways to improve your climbing is to climb more. Now, this should be done with some caution. If you are a beginner that is lacking in fitness overall, you will benefit most from integrating a workout routine that is not climbing based. Sticking to a base program of strength training, stretching, and cardio/aerobic exercise is the best way to prevent injury as you prepare your body for more climbing when it is ready.

A common misconception is that to be a better climber, you need to be stronger. That is not true at all. Climbing is a combination of strength and technique. Your overall strength and flexibility will only get you so far as you need to have the appropriate technique and mental stamina to push you further.

Jumping straight into hard physical training is a sure-fire way to get an injury. You have to give your tendons time to catch up to your muscles. You may be physically strong on a muscular level, but your tendons take much longer to build proper strength. If you already have a good base of strength in climbing-specific muscle groups and have built up connective tissues over time, then you will be ready to start a workout regime that is climbing-specific. 

Once you’ve begun to move past a base-level of fitness, you should then start to look at your climbing goals. Decide for yourself how much time you can devote each week to training and climbing. After that, think about the reasons behind wanting to improve your climbing ability. Are you trying to move from gym climbing to outdoor climbing? Are you planning a trip to a certain climbing destination? Will you be bouldering, trad climbing, sport climbing, alpine, etc.? These are a few questions that can help you determine the type of workouts you should focus on. For example, a boulderer will work more on power, while a multi-pitch crack climber may want to focus on technique and endurance. 

Workouts to do While Climbing 

The workout options listed below are most effective when you can stick to a routine and follow it. They can be completed in a climbing gym or outdoors, but they are most often done in a gym. Throw in some Mantas True Wireless Earbuds and get to it.

Warm-Up

It doesn’t matter the type of workout you are doing, spend a few minutes getting warmed up. Warm-ups become increasingly effective in preventing injury as you climb higher grades or pursue harder workouts. 

Some activities to include in your climbing warm-up include: 

  • 10 minutes of cardio to get the blood circulating. Biking, jump rope, jumping jacks, jogging, etc.
  • Choose dynamic stretching with plenty of rotational movement. Head rolls, windmills, walking lunges, side twists, shoulder, and hip circles, etc.
  • Pyramid Climbing. Starting with a few climbs below your grade limit and build your way up to that. For example, if you’re pushing 5.11 at your highest climbing grade, start with 5.9 or lower. Climb two of those routes, then move onto a low grade 10, then onto a higher grade 10. The key is to increase the difficulty without struggling. You shouldn’t be getting pumped or falling off of any of these routes. This progression will give your climbing-specific muscles a warm-up without making them tired. 

Endurance

Pushing your boundaries of endurance in climbing is among the best ways to improve your technique as well. As you begin to get tired while climbing, you should start to depend on your technique versus your physical strength. Do this by choosing a route of moderate difficulty to you and staying on the wall for specific periods (no hanging or one hand rests either). There should be a few technical movements on the route. 

You can choose the time period based on your current ability level. For some climbers, this may only be 10 minutes. Other climbers may push 30-minute stints. The goal here is not to do as many repetitions as possible, but to keep moving and be on the wall the entire time. Slow, precise movements and placements of hands/feet will help you hone in on technique. This focus on placement can be amplified by combining downclimbing into this time.

You can do this on the top rope, auto-belay, or traverse a bouldering wall. Be sure that you are doing these exercises within the restrictions of your gym rules and are respectful of other climbers around you. It is not recommended to do this during peak gym hours. 

As you progress in this endurance exercise, you should begin to notice that your focus on technique becomes natural, your body movement should flow more easily, and your body weight will be over your feet more often. 

Power

Power workouts can easily be done while bouldering. This is great because if you don’t have a rope partner one day, you can focus on a power movement exercise. These types of exercises will be short bursts of activity at your climbing limit, not above. Pushing power moves above your threshold over and over is an excellent way to get hurt. 

Usually, a 10-foot boulder problem will suffice here. You will want problems that vary in style. So, look for a problem or multiple problems with variations in movements like big reaches, small crimps, overhanging movements, pinches, etc. You don’t want to be making the same power move over and over in this workout. The more variation in your movement gives you more diversity in muscles worked. 

Also, keep in mind that you will need more recovery time in between sets here than during endurance. You should also give yourself more recovery time between workouts. Limit power specific workouts to once or twice a week. 

Power-Endurance Combo

A combination workout of power and endurance will come with time and as you progress in your climbing. This can be done by climbing challenging sport routes back to back or linking boulder problems at your limit. While this stage of training will take time to get to, it is easy to plateau here. It most closely simulates redpointing or an onsite on real rock. Don’t be afraid to take breaks from this workout and focus on just one or the other. Too much focus here can lead to injury. 

Cool Down

Just as you warm-up before your workout, cool down is essential as well. Most cooldowns will help to lower your heart rate and give your muscles time to stretch. Many warm-up exercises can be used to cool down as well. 

Cross-Training Exercises

Doing exercises outside of the act of climbing is often overlooked. However, it is the key to staving off injury and keeping overall health in check. Cross-training for climbing will help you isolate muscles that oppose the ones your use often while climbing. It will also improve your flexibility and endurance. 

Some great cross-training exercises include:

  • Yoga
  • Swimming, running, biking, basically any cardio 
  • Push-Ups (of all varieties)
  • Dips
  • Core exercises like planks, Russian twists, leg raises, etc
  • Wrist Curls
  • Thereaband Exercises

This is not an all-inclusive list. The main take away from these examples is that you should focus on variation and antagonistic exercises. Antagonistic exercises are the ones that focus on muscles opposite of those used when climbing to prevent injury and to correct and muscular imbalances. Primary areas to focus on include your shoulders, fingers, and knees as these get used intensely when climbing. 

Finger strength workouts are just as important. However, we did not cover these here as this article is best for beginners and intermediate climbers. As you become more advanced and your tendons are stronger, you can start to isolate exercises to your fingers.

Beginner’s Guide to Backcountry Hiking

Going out for a hike can span the time of a few hours, an entire day, or even days, weeks, and months. While hiking and backpacking are two different disciplines to prepare for, they do have many similarities. Getting off crowded metropolitan hikes and popular AllTrails picks can be both scary and extremely rewarding. Venturing into the backcountry should be built up to and takes a bit more planning than hikes you may be used to. 

As a beginner’s guide to backcountry hiking, we will be focusing specifically on hikes that can be completed in one day and require no overnights on the trail. Our goal is to give you the knowledge and reference points you need to feel confident, safe, and prepared on your upcoming backcountry hike. 

Take a Hike

Have Proper Hiking Equipment

Since you are only planning for a day hike, you will not need too much in the way of gear. While it may not seem like you need all of these things, keep in mind that you will be miles away from any roads and even further from any cities. You may not even have cell phone service for the majority of the day. So, you will need to be prepared and bring the necessary supplies. 

The most important things to bring with you when you are hiking in the backcountry include: 

  • Lightweight Daypack → If you don’t already have one, you will want to invest in a daypack that is intended for hiking. These packs are designed to be comfortable and have easy access compartments for organization of supplies. Many daypacks also come equipped with a hydration system. 
  • Hydration System and Snacks → Water is of the most essential things you will need in the backcountry. Water will also be the heaviest thing you carry, but that doesn’t mean to skimp out. Bring more than you think you need the first time you head into the backcountry. Don’t forget to pack a few trail snacks and maybe lunch if it is a long hike. 
  • Reliable Hiking Boots → The style of hiking shoes you wear will be up to you. Some hikers prefer to wear trail running shoes, while others like to have the classic ankle support high tops. Just be sure that your hiking shoes are broken in properly and have little chance of giving you blisters. Comfortable footwear is the key to an enjoyable hike! 
  • Map of Area, Guidebook, or GPS → Most hiking areas will have hard copies of maps and guidebooks, but you can also opt to download maps onto your phone. Better yet, you can take a backcountry GPS with you. If you go the digital route, keep in mind that your battery will not last forever. So, if you download maps on your phone, consider bringing a portable power bank as well. 
  • First Aid Kit → You may think that this is an unnecessary weight to carry, but better safe than sorry in the backcountry. This kit doesn’t need to be extreme, but it is good to have a few standard first aid supplies in case of an emergency on the trail. 

It can be tempting to kind of skimp on your first round of hiking gear and buy the cheapest options. While a limited budget may be a factor here, consider purchasing higher quality gear second hand or scoping out some discounts at retailers like REI to get higher quality, longer-lasting gear at a lower cost. 

Do Area Trail Research

Make sure you take time to get to know the area before you wander into the woods to get lost! This can be done in a variety of ways. You can go to old school techniques and talk to people from the area that may know the trail systems well. This can also include consulting park rangers and BLM land managers. Oftentimes, this is the most reliable way to go about things, because they will have access to the most recent trail conditions. 

Another common way of researching backcountry trails is to check out websites like All Trails, Hiking Project, and Summit Post. AllTrails can be especially helpful as you can download the app on your phone to have access to downloaded area maps when you’re hiking. 

If those maps aren’t detailed enough, you should invest in a digital or hard copy topographic map of the area. You can find these online and at many outdoor retail stores. 

Beyond knowing where you are going, you should be researching the area’s climate, wildlife, and plants. Look into the weather ahead of time to be sure that you pack accordingly. If you are hiking in a mountainous area, check for afternoon storms. Being aware of area wildlife and plant life will let you know if there are any dangerous animals or poisonous plants to avoid.

Prepare Physically for the Hike

If you are an avid hiker on familiar city trails or low key hiking trails close to town, then you are likely already in relatively good physical condition. Part of researching the area you will be hiking will include knowing the terrain to expect. 

If you are going to be hiking in a notoriously hilly area or a drastically different altitude than you are accustomed to, then you should prepare before attempting the hike. While you may be mentally ready, not being physically fit in the backcountry can be a serious danger. 

As you ramp up to your first backcountry hike, try to fit extra cardio and hiking time into your schedule. Get your legs ready at the gym by utilizing the stair stepper and doing squats. Building up your stamina and strength, will make a difference in safety, as well as how much you enjoy the hike overall. 

Leave No Trace

As you go out into the wilderness to enjoy the solitude and beauty, remember that we are sharing this Earth with other living plants and animals as well. One of the most important things you can take away from this article is to learn the Leave No Trace principles. Keep our wild places wild as we protect our outdoor spaces together! 

What is a Power Bank?

power bank splash
Kodiak Plus Ultra – Waterproof Power Bank

A power bank has many different names; a portable charger, backup battery, battery pack, and sometimes they have been called mobile electrical storage receptacle. Okay so maybe you haven’t run into anyone calling a power bank a mobile electrical storage receptacle but you never know, I’ve heard some pretty strange things in my day.

  • What is a power bank? It’s a battery that you can charge your stuff with.
  • What kind of stuff can a backup battery charge? A cell phone, GoPro, and other small electronics.
  • Are power banks rechargeable? Usually, a power bank is rechargeable.
  • What do I do when my portable charger is out of batteries? You can plug it in and charge it up again?
  • How long will a backup battery last? It depends on the capacity (size of the battery). Usually, you can get a few cell phone charges out of a power bank.

It seems like you have a lot of questions about power banks and portable power in general. You should probably take a look at a power bank that we make.

If you are looking for the best portable charger well you are in luck because we actually make some of those. Yeah, I don’t want to brag but our power banks are rugged, waterproof, and don’t look lame. We call them the Kodiaks. They have some pretty rad features. QuickCharge, USB C, Flashlight, and more; just click on that link above to see all the StuffYouProbablyWant.

Or, you can look at this picture of a goat. I call him Mr. Wavy Ice, it suits him.

Mr. Wavy Ice

There is a funny story about Mr. Wavy Ice but due to legal ramifications, I can’t go into it. Let’s just say that Mr Wavy it no longer allowed at Red Robin.

National Margarita Day – Margarita of the Year

It’s National Margarita Day! Do you know what this means?!? Yea, nothing really, but there’s this pretty rad competition that Patron holds every year that coincides with this day and I’m going to tell you all about it.

In honor of National Margarita Day, Patron has launched their annual Margarita of the Year competition, where people from all around the world compete to win… well, Margarita of the year. I know, it probably sounds uneventful, but these heavenly concoctions are far from that. See for yourself:

So, just to recap we’ve got:

  • CORALINA MARGARITA

    Red Wine & Hibiscus

  • MUMBAI MARGARITA

    Mango & Indian Spices

  • ENGLISH GARDEN MARGARITA

    Green Peas & Earl Grey Tea

  • TROPICANTE MARGARITA

    Mango & Fresh Avocado

  • HIGH PLAINS MARGARITA

    Charred Pineapple & Sage

  • PACIFIC RIM MARGARITA

    Coconut & Jalapeño

  • TIKI RITA

    Grapefruit & Tiki Spices

I know which one i’m voting for; if you think you’ve got the winner, you can vote for your choice here.

The Real Debate Tonight is What to Drink

All this political banter is making us more crazy, and more impatient than we appreciate; I am sure you can agree. These days, watching a white sheet dry is frankly more appealing than sitting through hours of a lemon faced, orange and an email scandal. I’ve come to realize at the end of each day, and each debate, I need a drink, and maybe you do too.

The greatest alternative to a boggled mind, is a calming cocktail (or three). Check out these 5 drinks that will put all your political worries at ease; you’re welcome.

  1. AMF – The Adios Mother F*ck3r is kind of a party pack of alcohols if you will, and probably the most intricate drink on our list. For good reasons. With vodka, gin, white rum and some blue curacao, sour mix and 7-Up, this mixed drink will definitely leave you with no worries when you’re done with it. Or thoughts or feelings for that matter.
  2. Chai Fireball Tea – Yea, you read that right. This is one of those weird Pumpkin Spice Latte things where you feel like a teenage girl while you’re drinking it, but its also really damn good so you choose not to care. Fix up a steaming pot of Chai, douse it with whiskey, and let the debate games begin.
  3. Cape Cod – Just like Cape Cod itself, this drink has got a hook. The cranberry juice and lime mixture are sure to reel you in, and the vodka is there to make you stay. and keep coming back. Night night.
  4. Paloma – Simple yet delicious, the Paloma is 3 parts grapefruit soda, 1 part tequila and a lime. Tune out the noise with this sour sipper and use the lime to practice your own DT squish face.
  5. Mai Tai – Saving the best for last, the ultimate mind calming cocktail, the Mai Tai. From the first debates in history to the ones at the end of time, this vacation in a cup will never get old. Tune in, Shake well, serve and repeat.

If one of these doesn’t sound appetizing enough for the big show, then you really should be more open minded. Work on it.

Outdoor Tech: FAQ

I decided to write this blog post due to the vast number of questions we get, on the daily, that are on repeat. If you are wondering who to contact if your product is broken or missing a piece, if you’re curious about our sponsorship program, or you would just like some good ole fashioned Yowie stickers, this is the place to be.

  1. My ODT product is no longer working/will not work/is missing a piece, who do I contact?
    • Please email our customer service department at support@outdoortech.com or call 310-677-0190. We will try our very best to help you in whatever situation you are in.
  2. I emailed/called customer support but have not received a response.
    • We take pride in our customer service, and we try our best to do a damn good job at getting you to where you want to be. Some days are busier than others so if you don’t receive a response, we didn’t forget about you, we will be with you shortly. Also, don’t hesitate to keep bugging us. We WANT to help you.
  3. Are your giveaways real? I never see that anyone wins.
    • Yes, our giveaways are 100% authentic and a winner is picked at random at the end of each one. We announce the winner on our Facebook page every Friday, so if you would like to see who won, please refer to our Facebook page.
  4. How do I enter your giveaway?
    • If you are on your mobile device, you can enter my clicking on the link in our Instagram bio, or by selecting the image associated with the contest post on our Facebook page. If you are on a laptop or desktop computer, you can go straight to the “Free Stuff!” tab on our Facebook page. This tab is located below our cover photo and above our status. You can also see our contests/who the winner is on our ODT Blog.
  5. What is going on with the Exoskeleton?
    • We want the Exoskeleton to be perfect, and if it’s not perfect, we won’t sell it to you. As soon as it is perfect however, it will be on our site for you to purchase.
  6. I am an amazing athlete and would love to be sponsored by you. How do I do that?
    • If you are big time you can email ryan@outdoortech.com and include an athlete resume and links to current content and social media posts.
  7. I would like to team up with your company for an event/giveaway/donation/etc. Who do I contact?
  8. I took some rad photos of Outdoor Tech stuff and would love if you could share them. Where can I send them?
    • Please feel free to tag us in any of your posts about Outdoor Tech on social, we love to share awesome content from our fans when appropriate. If you’ve taken photos that are just too good that you haven’t posted them on social media, you can email them to marketing@outdoortech.com and we will share them if appropriate. Just keep in mind, we can’t share everything.
  9. I would love some ODT stickers. How do I get some?
    • NEWSTICKERS
  10. Is it cool to message you guys on social media about any of the above?
    • Go for it, but why would you after reading this blog post?

6 Ways to Piss Off a Mountain Town Local

When you’re heading off for a ski vacation in the mountains, you’re bound to come into contact with varying degrees of locals*.

*The definition of local is a hotly debated topic that will be saved for another time.

Locals will check you into your hotel, tune your skis, pour your beer, and mend your sprained wrist. Get on their good side, and locals will also show you some sweet powder stashes, advise you on what activities are tourist traps, and let you in on the best place in town to grab a breakfast burrito.

And if you get on their bad side? Well, you’ll have to wait and see what that’s like. Here are 6 easy ways to piss off a mountain town local. (Warning: we are not responsible for the consequences of doing the following).

Don’t Tip
Money can’t buy you happiness: that’s the message you want to send to your server/bartender/cab driver/etc. Forget the fact that they’re overeducated and underpaid: they didn’t move to the mountains to make money. So after you’ve enjoyed a multi-course meal, asked for every modification humanly possible, and imbibed in custom-created cocktails, put a big fat zero on that tip line. Sign on the dotted line, give your server a thumb’s up for the great service, and go on your merry way.

Be a Know-It-All
You spent your lunch break scouring TripAdvisor and brushing up on your Wikipedia knowledge. Don’t let those facts go to waste. That guy you’re sharing the gondola with—the one who was born and raised in this very mountain town—doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Correct him about anything and everything, ranging from what time the mountain opens at to where they put the moguls in the summertime.

Be Condescending
“Aren’t your parents disappointed in you?” is a perfectly acceptable opener when talking with a mountain town local. Mountain town locals don’t make as much money as you, their house isn’t as pretty as yours, and their job title is totally lame (they probably don’t even have a business card). Assert your superiority, and don’t hide your smugness.

One Up Them
One of the best ways to piss off a mountain town local is to pull out the old bait-and-switch. Start conversing with them as though you actually care about what they have to say. Be kind, polite, and interested—then sweep the rug out from under their feet. Any time they express happiness or pride in their mountain town, one up them. “Yeah, the terrain here is okay, but it’s nothing compared to Chamonix.” “You think THIS is snow? Have you ever even been to Japan?” “This place is a hell hole. I don’t know how you live here.”

One easy way to rub salt in the wound is to throw in a casual post-remark, “No offense.”

Trash the Place
Being on vacation officially entitles you to throw away every shred of common sense and decency within your being. Don’t waste your time looking for a trash can—toss it on the ground! Drink ‘til you have to puke, and when you do, be sure to puke directly on a store window. Learn some tips from these guys—they know what’s up.

Announce Yourself
“Do you know who I am?” Those six magic words are the key to getting everything you want. Don’t be afraid to name drop the fact that your neighbor’s sister-in-law’s dad is the guy who runs the mountain… even if it isn’t true.

7 Things You Must Have to Survive a Blizzard at Home

I can actually think of about 30 things you really should have, but that’s counting a case of beer as 24 things.

Emergency Supplies

They say in a storm you should have batteries, candles, canned goods, fresh water, and firewood if you have a fireplace or wood-burning stove. This is all in case the power goes out, and they do have a point. My advice covers those storms where the power is on just the desire or ability to get to work seems missing.

Good Neighbors

To some it may be the guy with the snow blower. A good neighbor will clear off your sidewalk and driveway. A great neighbor will stay for a drink or three after he’s done. Good neighbors help one another: push your car when stuck, share food if you’re low, and help shovel snow if that snow blower doesn’t show up.

Food

OT_Blog_Featured_03It’s best to stock up because you never know how long you’ll be stuck at home. Milk, eggs, fresh veggies and fruit disappear first from your grocer’s shelves, and will soon after go bad on yours, so don’t even bother with those. Go for chips, cookies, burgers, and pop, you know: the 4 main food groups.

Alcohol

OT_Blog_Featured_04The second busiest store next to the supermarket before a blizzard is the liquor store. When the flakes start flying, the local liquor store makes the mall on Christmas Eve look like a slow day. Obviously I’m not the only one thinking this way. Beer and wine go first, then, if the warnings are serious, whiskey and vodka go next. Wine coolers never sell out but a run on peppermint schnapps is possible as visions of hot chocolate starts dancing in our heads.

Munchies

OT_Blog_Featured_05This doesn’t mean just food; you need quality munchies. Just like any other time you’re watching a movie you want munchies; it’s just, this time, you’re watching about 36 hours of movies. That means popcorn, chips, pop, and junior mints, the standard movie fare everywhere.

Movies

OT_Blog_Featured_06Used to be, when the forecast was ominous, we would head straight to the video rental store. Now that shows how long I’ve been at this. Nowadays I keep the DVR stocked up with recordings, and that’s just in case the dish goes out. Sure, some of you have streaming capabilities but, believe it or not, the internet can go down, or at least your provider does. I’ve heard people used to just sit around and read or actually talk to one another. Of course they also cooked over the fire and wore loincloths as well.

A Loving (or at least understanding) Partner

OT_Blog_Featured_07Okay, I admit, I’m not the easiest guy to get along with. Being shut-in with me for 2 or 3 days should merit some kind of medal. Actually, being shut in with anyone for an extended period of time can be brutal; they call it stir-crazy or cabin fever. She can only take so many times of me whining, “I’m bored.” That’s where the neighbors, the movies, and the alcohol really come into effect. All three offer her some form of escape.

6 Ways to Survive a Rainy Day on the Mountain

Forecasts of precipitation in your favorite ski town are usually a good thing—after all, the magic equation is precipitation + cold = pow.

But if you remove the cold element from that equation, you’re left with a slightly nastier result: rain.

No matter how you frame it, a rainy day on the mountain kind of sucks. You’ll get soaking wet pretty quickly, and the snow that’s already on the mountain will get heavy and weird (or melty and miserable).

As the old saying goes, when life gives you lemons, whip up a tasty batch of lemonade. Here’s how to make lemonade from soggy mountain conditions.

Gear Up

OT_Blog_Featured_01Continuing with the grandpa sayings, there’s no such thing as bad weather—there’s just bad clothing. In other words, if you’re wearing the right stuff, you can have a good time in just about any condition. So bust out the GoreTex and pack along an extra pair of gloves and go skiing.

If you don’t feel like springing a month (plus) of rent on waterproof snow gear, you could always resort to the old fashioned garbage bag poncho. If it’s good enough for the lifties, it’s good enough for you.

Switch Your Stick(s)

OT_Blog_Featured_02If the rainy conditions limit you to groomers or if you know that it’s unlikely that you’ll last more than a few hours up top, have a little fun with it. Get everyone in your posse to switch their sticks: if they usually snowboard, have them pick up a pair of skis, and vice versa. Laugh at each other as you flail madly down the mountain in unfamiliar gear. Given that you’re learning in horrible conditions, you’ll undoubtedly walk away with full confidence that your initial gear of choice is by far the best.

Get High

OT_Blog_Featured_03Unless you’re experiencing some funky inversion action, the general rule of thumb is that the higher you go, the colder it gets (duh). So if it’s pouring down low, it just might be snowing like crazy up in the alpine. If you get really lucky, you might get the most magical pow day of all time—and the lift lines will be non-existent, since the rain will have scared the masses away.

Just Give ‘Er

OT_Blog_Featured_04Of course, there’s always the option to just suck it up, buttercup. You’ve come this far to go skiing—are you really going to let a little rain scare you off?

Remember what’s waiting for you at the end of the day: a warm shower, a cold brew, and a hot plate of nachos. Keep that in mind as you power through soggy lap after soggy lap, you hardcore snow sporter.

Give Up and Be Lazy

OT_Blog_Featured_05If you can’t stomach the thought of spending your money on a lift ticket to shred in horrible conditions, then give up on the dream and make other plans. Throw on your rattiest pair of sweatpants, invite some friends over (instruct them to bring snacks and pizza), and indulge in a marathon session of ski movie watching. The powder on the screen is definitely better than the non-existent powder outside.

Give Up and Go Crazy

OT_Blog_Featured_06Too much pent up energy to spend the day on the couch? Then get creative and enjoy the other aspect of a ski town: the partying. Plan your own original pub crawl: aim to try every drink on the menu between your crew, or hop from bar to bar and order their signature beverage.

There you have it: the proverbial ski town lemonade.